The ORB

 

Career Planning

What makes a career amazing? Is it the amount of money you make? Stability? Prestige? The actual job duties? The required training (or lack of it)? The teamwork? The independent work? The way it utilizes your skills? The answer is yes! And no! All these things could make a career amazing but not all of them do ... at least not for everyone. Another person's idea of an amazing career won't necessarily be yours.You should know that there's an amazing career for everyone.

So you think you know yourself really well. Well, then, what is your personality type? What are your work-related values? What are your interests? Do you have any aptitudes? Huh? Why does any of this even matter? It matters because in order to find an amazing career, you need to know the answers to these questions. If you don't, it will be hard to discover whether a career is a good fit for you. If it isn't a good fit for you, it won't be amazing at all.

Instead you will find going to work every day a burden. The best way to learn all about yourself is by doing a thorough self assessment. It is important to note that you must consider not just one aspect of a self assessment—personality, interests, values OR aptitude—but instead all of them together. Just because a career might be suitable for someone with your personality, it doesn't mean it correlates with your values, for example.

 

If you are wondering if it's possible to find an amazing career without doing a formal self-assessment, it is. You do have to know quite a bit about yourself, though, and what you do and don't want in a career and what you will and won't like about it. Many people have picked careers they love and have done so in a very unscientific way. For example, they hear about an occupation from someone they know or read about one.

 

One thing everyone needs to do no matter how they come upon a career is to gather information about it.

Career Exploration

AoPE Level 3

This unit provides an opportunity for candidates to explore a range of career opportunities and to plan how to develop the skills and knowledge they need to pursue their career goals successfully. Candidates will research, analyse and evaluate information about career opportunities that interest them. They should consider opportunities across different sectors/settings (e.g. retail, health and social care, education, management, ICT, customer care) and then identify a particular career to explore further. Based on this exploration, a candidate should be able to develop a career plan which accurately reflects their skills, interests and aspirations. Learners need to have an understanding of how a career plan can help an individual make progress towards achieving their career goals.

Having identified at least two occupational sectors relevant to their career interests, candidates must research information about opportunities within those sectors. The candidate must identify at least three different sources of information (e.g. websites, books, journals, careers advisers, HR managers) and decide what criteria to use to judge the quality and relevance of the different sources. For example, their judgments might be based on the type of information, its level of detail, how current it is, the specialist level of knowledge of an individual adviser, any perceived bias, etc. Candidates must provide evidence of analysing information about at least two career options (e.g. to identify similarities and differences in terms of qualification requirements, opportunities for progression, income potential, job satisfaction, etc.). Candidates must be able to describe the opportunities that would result from choosing a specific career option (e.g. someone choosing to do a nursing degree would be able to select from a range of disciplines in which to specialise, there are opportunities to work overseas and in different areas of the UK). Candidates must be able to identify the benefits and disadvantages of the particular career pathway (e.g. nursing offers flexible working and personal satisfaction but disadvantages could include a stressful working environment and relatively poor pay).

This unit provides an opportunity for candidates to explore a range of career opportunities and to plan how to develop the skills and knowledge they need to pursue their career goals successfully. Candidates will research, analyse and evaluate information about career opportunities that interest them. They should consider opportunities across different sectors/settings (e.g. retail, health and social care, education, management, ICT, customer care) and then identify a particular career to explore further. Based on this exploration, a candidate should be able to develop a career plan which accurately reflects their skills, interests and aspirations. Learners need to have an understanding of how a career plan can help an individual make progress towards achieving their career goals.

 

 CE3.1 Having identified at least two occupational sectors relevant to their career interests, candidates must research information about opportunities within those sectors. The candidate must identify at least three different sources of information (e.g. websites, books, journals, careers advisers, HR managers) and decide what criteria to use to judge the quality and relevance of the different sources. For example, their judgments might be based on the type of information, its level of detail, how current it is, the specialist level of knowledge of an individual adviser, any perceived bias, etc. Candidates must provide evidence of analysing information about at least two career options (e.g. to identify similarities and differences in terms of qualification requirements, opportunities for progression, income potential, job satisfaction, etc.). Candidates must be able to describe the opportunities that would result from choosing a specific career option (e.g. someone choosing to do a nursing degree would be able to select from a range of disciplines in which to specialise, there are opportunities to work overseas and in different areas of the UK). Candidates must be able to identify the benefits and disadvantages of the particular career pathway (e.g. nursing offers flexible working and personal satisfaction but disadvantages could include a stressful working environment and relatively poor pay).

Task

  1. Identify two occupational sectors relevant to your interests.
  2. Identify two jobs and complete the form below

You will need:

  1. a) Four different sources of information clearly showing and identify where the source has come from (e.g websites, books journal, career advisers etc)

Download Form

 

Job Skills

Skills Heath Check

The Skills Health Check Tools are a set of online questionnaires with a report. They are designed to give you information about your skills, interests and motivations in the workplace. The tools help you to think about the kinds of jobs that might be best for you in future.

Register with the national careers service

register

Complete the following assessments on your personal skills:

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Plagiarism and Referencing

Plagiarism and Referencing

‘What is plagiarism?’

Plagiarism is not always a black and white issue. The boundary between plagiarism and research is often unclear. Learning to recognize the various forms of plagiarism, especially the more ambiguous ones, is an important step towards effective prevention.

Each of the 10 most common types of plagiarism are defined below. The types are ranked in order of severity of intent.

Each of the 10 most common types of plagiarism are defined below. The types are ranked in order of severity of intent.

  1. Clone-Submitting another’s work, word-for-word, as one’s own
  2. CTRL-C-Contains significant portions of text from a single source without alterations
  3. Find – Replace-Changing key words and phrases but retaining the essential content of the source
  4. Remix-Paraphrases from multiple sources, made to fit together
  5. Recycle-Borrows generously from the writer’s previous work without citation
  6. Hybrid-combines perfectly cited sources with copied passages without citation
  7. Mashup-Mixes copied material from multiple sources
  8. 404 Error-Includes citations to non-existent or inaccurate information about sources
  9. Aggregator-Includes proper citation to sources but the paper contains almost no original work
  10. Re-tweet-Includes proper citation, but relies too closely on the text’s original wording and/or structure

http://www.plagiarism.org/citing-sources/overview/